What the heck is Quinoa and why would anyone eat it?

Quinoa is a flowering plant grown primarily for its edible seeds, according to Wikipedia. And that's exactly what it looks like before being cooked. A bag of bird seed.

TSM

Quinoa was first used to feed livestock. Humans didn't start eating it until 3 to 4 thousand years ago in Peru and Bolivia. Why people kept eating it is another question.

The seeds are said to be rich in protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. They are also poor in flavor and the texture isn't much better.

Health officials say a cup of quinoa contains two times more protein, less calories and carbohydrates and about 5 more grams of fiber than white rice. It also help lower cholesterol and control blood sugar levels.

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Why is it everything that's good for you doesn't taste very good?

And how do you even pronounce it. Queen-wa? Quin-oa? Nope it's keen-waa. But there's not much to be keen about.

Quinoa may be good for you and it could possibly be better if you cook it differently, cover it in spices, sauce or anything that doesn't make it taste like you're eating something that should be for babies - birds not humans. The dog wouldn't even eat it.

It's soft and tasteless. And you can't get it out of your mouth. No matter how much you swallow, gargle or lick your gums. It's like the glitter of food. You'll find a seed in your tooth, lip or even clothes, hours later.

We gave it a try on Cooking with Polly. Don't think we'll try it again. If you're a fan, let me know. I have three bags for you.

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