Two New York police officers helped a homeless man after they were called to arrest him for shoplifting.

Officers Christopher Cartwright and Jason Velez of the Mount Vernon Police Department, in Westchester County were called to a Dollar Tree for a possible shoplifting. When the Officers arrived, they found the man still inside the store. After speaking with him, they realized he was homeless and was just looking for socks. "I'll buy you a couple pairs of socks, but you gotta stop stealing," the officers told the man.

Officer Cartwright bought $15 worth of socks the man admitted he was trying to steal. "See what you get when you're honest."

Officer Velez also advised the man he could get assistance at police headquarters for anything he may need. "At least get you a bed and a shower."

On his way out the store manager even told the man if he ever needed anything, she'd also be willing to help. "I'll pay for it out of my own pocket."

The man thanked the officers and the store manager and went on his way.

"We want to thank not only Officers Cartwright and Velez but also the manager of the Dollar Tree, who not only authorized us not arresting the person of interest, but also advising him that if he was in need, he could just tell her," Mount Vernon Police shared on Facebook, along with a video the kind gesture. "These positive incidents happen every day in our city, not only with the police, but also with our other municipal employees and with our business partners.

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