If a previous owner or tenant died in the house or apartment you're currently living in, would you want to know? If your answer is yes here's how to find out.

Maybe you feel as if your house is haunted, or maybe you want to know for property value reasons. Either way it's hard information to come by - did someone die in my house?

Now thanks to DiedInHouse.com, you'll be able to know not only if anyone died, but also if there has been a fire or flood on the property, if any registered sex offenders have lived there, and even if any meth labs have been discovered on the property in the past.

DiedInHouse.com was created in 2013 by a software company in South Carolina. The first search tool of its kind, it gives users death records associated with any specific address by searching over 118 million records.

Having a death in a property can reduce the value by 25%, and DiedInHouse.com found that a lot of states don't have any rules on the matter.

From DiedInHouse.com:

Most states do not have a law to disclose that a property is stigmatized. Three states have a law to disclose events within one to three years of the purchase date. Fifteen states have a law that only if the buyer asks and only if the seller knows they are to disclose the information, but no legal action can be taken if they do not. The remaining thirty-two states have no law, therefore no legal action can be taken against the seller or agent for not disclosing.

Here's a prominent 'died in house' story from DiedInHouse.com that helps explain why this is important to buyers:

Thornton, PA – A California women moved herself and her kids closer to her family in Pennsylvania after her husband passed away in California. She bought a house in 2007 and later found out that a year earlier a man killed his wife then he committed suicide in the house. ABC News, among others, covered the story. Being aware of the murder-suicide, a couple bought the home on October 31, 2006 for $450,000. They later sold it to Janet Milliken a year later for $600,000 and did not disclose the incident to the Ms. Milliken. Once she found out she went to court to have the transaction rescinded and to recoup her money. Since there is no state law stating that it has to be disclosed, the judge ruled against Milliken and she is stuck with the house.

You can read more examples at DiedInHouse.com/FAQs.

The service isn't free, but for just $12 you'll have some peace of mind(or not) and be able to sleep soundly at night(or not).

Have you ever wanted to know if someone died in your house before you lived there?


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